Everything we do depends on the weather, and nobody knows our changing skies better than meteorologist Jim Cantore. As one of the most well known faces in forecasting, he’s spent decades on the front lines of some of the world’s most severe weather events and knows exactly how far predictive data has come — from prayers and educated guesswork to artificial intelligence and mind-blowing CGI. Hear his take on that evolution, trust-building, and what self-driving can learn from weather prediction technology.

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Episode Transcript

Alex Roy

Hey everyone, this is No Parking, the podcast that cuts through the hype around self-driving technology and artificial intelligence. I’m Alex Roy, here with my co-host, roboticist Bryan Salesky.

Bryan Salesky

Hey Alex.

Alex Roy

One of my favorite lines is the quote, “I’m an optimist, but an optimist who carries a raincoat.” But you wouldn’t have to carry a raincoat every day if you knew with 100% certainty that it wasn’t going to rain. Everything we do depends on what the weatherman or weatherwoman says. Shorts or pants? Check the weather. Schools open or closed? Depends on the weather. Should this plane take off? You’ll want to know what the weather is before you get on board. Accurate forecasting matters for self-driving cars too, because they need to be smart enough not to drive into the kinds of unsafe conditions that people do all the time, which is why human drivers crash more in bad weather.

And weather prediction has come a long way, from prayer to educated guesswork to artificial intelligence tools. But at the end of the day, or really every morning, there’s still a human being in the mix making that call. So today we’re joined by one of the world’s most popular meteorologists, the Weather Channel’s Jim Cantore. He’s been on the ground, literally in the eye of the hurricane too many times to count. The joke goes, if Cantore’s in town, it’s time to leave. And I guess we should all be glad we’re remote today. Jim, welcome to the No Parking Podcast.

Jim Cantore

Well said. Thanks for having me, guys. This should be a great conversation. I’m looking forward to it.

Alex Roy

Well just to be safe Jim, what city are you in?

Jim Cantore

I am in Smyrna, Georgia. So I’m even giving you the suburb of Atlanta and I’m in.

Alex Roy

I’m so glad to hear that. So far, far from me and Bryan. So I’ve read that you’re a fan of old war movies, especially Band of Brothers, which depicts the D-Day invasion of Normandy. And a lot of people forget that major historical events often hinge on the weather. Napoleon in Russia, Washington and Valley Forge, and of course, Eisenhower at Normandy. He had to keep a close eye on the weather forecasts and he had to make a call on June 5th of 1944 about whether they were going to invade or not. Weather forecasting has come a long way since World War II. What did weather prediction look like 75 years ago or even longer?

Jim Cantore

It was a bunch of data points, ships, maybe connecting the pressure lines and coming up with a solution day by day. You you’re not talking about satellites here. You can watch the system, you can see what it was doing. Was it intensifying? Was it going to split? Like you were talking about, would we get a break in the weather over the English channel to send our troops, and talk about a gutsy call. There was no fun ride, because just because the weather breaks doesn’t mean the waves do. So imagine being those guys going across the channel with huge waves and then getting off on the beach for the fight of your life.

We’re just part of the equation. And even today though, we get the forecasts wrong. Sometimes we get it right. But I like to think that we get it more right than wrong. And there’s a lot of details, and certainly a lot of people that can be impacted by even the slightest detail in the forecast. If the snow starts at 7:00 PM versus 5:00 PM, that may save your evening commute from absolute gridlock. But what if you’re forecasting it to start late and it starts early? Uh oh. And we’ve seen that before in many cities.

Alex Roy

So what are the different methods of gathering weather today versus 75 years… What do you actually use? What are the sensors? What does that look like?

Jim Cantore

There’s been an upgrade to the satellites over numerous occasions. We have several. 75 years ago… They came out in the 60s. We have radar that’s also gotten more advanced, more definitive on what we can see. Different modes of that radar, where you can see what’s going on in the storm or in the clouds. Is it raining or is it snowing? Where’s that changeover area? Is it sitting just West in Kansas city and moving East? You can actually see that on the radar. The model data itself, you’ve taken huge grids of data and shrunk them down to just a few kilometers. And because of the speeds of the computer, you can crunch all the data in those short grids and come up with a very high resolution forecast. You can see details of topography.

You can see details of, let’s say, on the lake where you would have early winter, more of a rain situation in Buffalo than a snow situation just inland or down in the highlands of Southwest New York. You can actually see that come out on the model guidance. It’s pretty amazing. Now just because the model says that, doesn’t mean that that’s exactly what’s going to happen, because you still have to, as a meteorologist, interpolate that data, look for trends, look for things that say, “Well, you know what? I have a really high believability factor in there.” Or, “You know what? I really don’t have a high believability factor there.” And trust me, there’s never a boring day at the office for me. This is not a Southern California forecast. This is anywhere in the nation.

Alex Roy

So if you go back 75 or 100 years or more, literally people, if I understand it, were just looking at the sky, at the color of the sky, and trying to take temperature readings. And beyond that was just guesswork, speculation?

Jim Cantore

A lot of meteorologists in history looked at pressure changes for their weather information. So a lot of times you’d have a home barometer, and we could always watch that barometer. The pressure is always changing between high and low pressure. But there’s certain areas where that barometer gets in, or the trends in the barometer, in other words your pressure’s going up or your pressure’s coming down, that alludes you to a storm coming. Not being able to see it doesn’t really give you a lot of information of exactly what you’re going to get.

But back then it was easy to hunker down and wait the storm out, and then… Because when it started snowing, you were home, you stayed home. When it stopped snowing, you got out and shoveled your driveway and made your merry way down the road. And that still happens, but we have a lot more detail as to exactly when that starts, what the impacts are going to be specifically, the timing of it. And then some of the minor details. Is it a sleet rain to snow mixture? Is it a snow to rain situation like we can often find on the East coast. So those are the differences filling up to today.

Alex Roy

So at the time, I mean in 19th century, I imagine that you had a collection of individuals locally taking these measurements and making a local predictions or forecast. And then with the rise of morse code, they began stitching together regionally these patterns? Is that the birth of modern meteorology?

Jim Cantore

And the old teletype machine. They would just come across… We finally got electronics and wiring. Yeah, we could see what some of these maps look like. In 1900, there was a huge hurricane in Galveston. The day before it happened it was beautiful. There wasn’t even a wave coming in. So this forecaster had to make a forecast for a storm that he couldn’t even see. And unfortunately this storm came in and probably caused the most loss of life that we’ve ever seen from a tropical system. So I’m talking about the Galveston hurricane in 1900, where you’re talking about 8 to 12,000 lives were lost. Galveston was the big suburban cosmopolitan growth area back in 1900. That was going to be the big city in the South. But that hurricane changed all that.

Alex Roy

100 years ago, what was the percentage level of accuracy or even the range of accuracy of forecasts? Was it in the 20 to 40% range?

Jim Cantore

That’s probably a really good guess. Just because there’s so many subtleties. You may see the pressure coming up at the surface, but what if there’s a cold pocket of air coming in aloft? All of a sudden you’ve got these rain showers and thunderstorms popping up out of nowhere. Where did that come from? Pressure really hasn’t changed. Because what’s happening is the atmosphere is changing above you, above you, and you can’t really sometimes see that at the ground. So now with satellites and upper air analysis and weather balloons, I mean the good news is we’ve had weather balloons for a long, long time. So that’s given us at least an idea of what the atmospheres look like. But they are so spread apart and you don’t have them over the water, a lot of times near the coasts you never knew what was coming in. So it was a guess. That’s exactly what it was.

Alex Roy

When did you move from pure human intellect looking at data to using software or tools or artificial intelligence to aid-

Jim Cantore

Once we started getting into radar in the 50 and then better teletyping and satellites coming around in the 60s, and of course hurricane hunters going out as well, which used to be a part of the Navy and not the Air Force, which was really cool, all the way out, I think, till the 1970s. But those types of things… Anytime you can get data, you can get it in there and crunch it and get a better idea of what’s going on as a meteorologist. Data is always your friend, even to this day.

Bryan Salesky

Where else is data coming from, Jim? You mentioned satellite and obviously huge advancements in radar. What are the other sensors that make up a modern-

Jim Cantore

Yeah, satellites and numerical weather prediction. The faster the computers, the more numbers we can crunch, the smaller those grids can be. So imagine being in Denver back when they had the first couple of computer models coming out. You didn’t really know where the mountains were and you didn’t know where the influence was. So guidance there was very bad. Same thing for the Northeast coast. You knew there was an ocean there, but how much of the grid that you were sampling had that ocean with it? Nowadays we can literally sample the whole coast and even the topography on the coast. So you can get real high resolution data these days. Much, much better.

Bryan Salesky

The amount of compute really helps significantly that’s been available. But I have to imagine though that there’s a point where being able to deploy more sensors to get more resolution, whether it be more radar or more localized ways of measuring what’s actually happening on the ground, that that could help. When you look at the amount of infrastructure getting added into cities today with… Let’s look at the advent of 5G. That’s going to require a lot more towers, if you will, or more localized sensor pods, if you want to call them that. Cameras are getting installed in every intersection to help better manage traffic flow. You have to imagine there must be an opportunity to piggyback on all of this infrastructure that we’ll be investing in into the next century that would also help meteorology. Is that true?

Jim Cantore

I think there’s some helps and some hurts. I’ve heard that some of the 5G issues may have a cross issues with some of the satellite data or retrieving some of that. But even going back to social media, just having Twitter and Facebook… No seriously, it allows us… All of a sudden, you get a picture from a reliable source of a tornado over Northeast Texas coming towards Shreveport, and you’re like, “Holy smokes, look at that thing.” It’s a big elephant trunk or wedge tornado. Your whole demeanor as a broadcaster changes because now you’ve got clarification of what you’re seeing essentially on a radar.

Bryan Salesky

Yeah, now you really know the [crosstalk 00:12:42]-

Jim Cantore

Now you really know. So your whole tone changes on the air. We went back after April, 2011 and looked at why people reacted or didn’t react to tornado warnings, and one of the big things that came out of that as we need clarification, a lot of people said, “It’s great that you say it and we trust you and all that. For whatever reason, my best reaction came when I believed it and when I saw it.” So being able to have pictures and cameras and all that everywhere is huge for us, huge for us, because it makes what we’re showing you on maps, still, in some cases, one dimensional, believable, because now here it is in real life.

Bryan Salesky

You do have pretty incredible CGI at the Weather Channel. But I have to imagine there’s no substitute for a real picture of what’s happening.

Jim Cantore

No. So you’re talking about this immersive mixed reality, where we can literally set ourselves into a city and actually bring the cold fronts or the winter storm through, let’s say, Boston. So you’re standing in the bark or the Common. There’s a bit of the scene in the fall, and the leaves are off the trees, the grass is brown, and here comes this snow squall at four o’clock in the… We can call it and you can watch the ground turn white because of how we incorporate essentially the real-time weather forecast. So that’s really cool. And I think for the viewer to experience that, I don’t think anything drives a little more than that. Look, and then you, as a meteorologist know, “Well if we’re going to accumulate that quickly and the temperatures are just right, let’s say 27 degrees, it’s going to accumulate as soon as it starts coming down.” So those are little things you can put in there as broadcaster.

Bryan Salesky

I guess the hope is that’s going to drive human behavior and actually get people off the road if there’s an evacuation that has to be done, right? There’s no substitute for realistic imagery to motivate people.

Jim Cantore

To this day. We just had a snow situation in West Texas before Christmas. And granted, it does not snow down here that often. They’ve been dry as all get out, so really nothing’s happened. But you knew it was going to be a big event. It was very well advertised by the models. And we still had cars on the roads. So the one thing that we don’t have that you guys get a chance to do is you can set constants. But there’s no constant to human behavior, because everybody behaves differently. They assess their own risk.

They’re like, “What’s a few inches of snow. I’ll get out there. I’ll be fine.” But the roads were warm, you had snow coming down, dropping the temperatures below freezing, it instantly turned to an ice skate on the roads, and nobody went anywhere. It was gridlock. So you had people spending hours like 6, 10, 12, 14 hours on roads. So now you’re getting dangerous. You run out of food, you run out of gas and you can start your car and keep warm. So now there’s all sorts of other things that come into play when there’s that many people trapped on the roads. Roads.

Bryan Salesky

When you talk to the people who are responsible for snow removal in these cities, they’ll tell you that, “Hey, if we could just have two hours of just get everybody off the road, it’s all we need. We can get everything back in order and totally safe and avoid all this loss.” And this is where one of the benefits comes in with shared fleets of vehicles, where there really is a central command center that can send out a message that says, “Look, we’re going to suspend operations for just a couple of hours, give them breathing room before we resume certain types of services.” It’s in the better interest of the public, and it also helps out those first responders, right?

Jim Cantore

I cannot remember the year, but I know the governor. Governor Deval Patrick of Massachusetts. He literally shut down Boston. He said, “Once you get home, here’s the deal. Get home from the commute at 7:00 PM, and we’re shutting it down. We’re shutting down the interstates, everything.” And literally they got 25, 30 inches of snow out of this event. And by noon time the next day, because they could stay with the storm during the late evening and overnight, because there was nobody on the roads and the major thoroughfares, they had Boston up and running again.

Bryan Salesky

They can knock it out.

Jim Cantore

So what was for most people a crippling snow day, but it’s that kind of thing that we have to do. So when I look at AI down the road and certainly autonomous vehicles, is there going to be a situation where we’re like, “Look, if we’re expecting [inaudible 00:17:13] of snow in Boston, I’m sorry, we’re not going to let your car start. You’re not going to be able to start your car. Nobody’s going anywhere unless you are a first responder or you have a special permission or code to put into your vehicle.”

Bryan Salesky

Yeah. I think there’s-

Jim Cantore

There’s room there.

Bryan Salesky

There’s room to consider policies like that. You have to obviously be careful. There’s always special cases. But when it comes to providing general transportation for a city, there’s obviously always emergency needs, but there’s ways to at least control the density of the traffic and better manage it so that… Again, people just don’t understand, you talk to the city public works people. They can work miracles in a very short period of time, but if there’s gridlock everywhere, you can’t get the big trucks down the road, you can’t-

Jim Cantore

And one of the biggest sources of gridlock is a bus. A bus sliding perpendicular to the road-

Bryan Salesky

Jackknifed tractor trailer.

Jim Cantore

You’re locked up.

Alex Roy

When I was a kid, I still remember hearing the joke about like, “You can’t trust the weather guy. He doesn’t know what he’s talking about.” But in my adult life, I have found weather forecasts for 24 to 48 hours out to be extraordinarily accurate. So when did that trust or that accuracy reach a critical mass?

Jim Cantore

It’s better numerical weather prediction, which has really ramped up in the 90s, in the 2000s, and now it’s where we’re at today. The fact that it’s not just our country doing global weather models. Japan does it, the European center does it, the UK Met does it? Every country has their own meteorological organization to some extent.

Alex Roy

When did trust catch up with the reality of accuracy?

Jim Cantore

I think once we started getting it right. You start predicting things like the blizzard of 96, which… This was one of the most crippling Northeast blizzards ever. Some of the cities had the most snow they’ve ever had in history. But we nailed it. We knew it was coming. Governors took heed of this. They bought in and they did what they had to do to shut things down. There was no COVID back then. Everything was moving. Moving and grooving. But shut down infrastructure and they shut down transportation and airports and commutes. This is a major undertaking. Not to mention the economic loss. Because we stopped the machine, you lose dollars. That’s just the way it is. It’s being smart to shut it down for a while, because if you don’t, you don’t get it back up and running. And like I said, I go back to that example with governor Deval Patrick in Massachusetts. He did shut it down. And literally the next day Boston was up and running. I’ll never forget that.

Bryan Salesky

It really resonates with me because I lived through what we call Snowmageddon in Pittsburgh, which was either ’09 or ’10, is the most snow I’ve ever seen in my life. It was a moment where I opened my garage door and the snow bank was taller than me and I just closed it and went back inside. But Pittsburgh roofs were caving in because they couldn’t handle the load. The city had to pull snow out in dump trucks. They were running out of places to put it. And I don’t know that we expected as much that year. They didn’t forecast it super well. Just the amount, the quantity. We knew it was going to be a bad storm, but it was off the charts the amount that actually ended up coming down. As a result because of the coordination and preparedness the city learned a lot of lessons through that storm.

But it was really hard to get the snow out because there was so many vehicles left in situ. You just couldn’t get in to clean it up, and they just didn’t know what to do. Do you tow it? Do you move it out of the way? In some cases they had pictures of snowplows just actually pushing cars out of the way in order to just… For the greater good. There are a lot of really difficult decisions the city had to make, and it was just… That shows you the benefits of forecasting. If you could actually convey the urgency and convince people, then you can keep the roads clear and they would have been able to have the city of Pittsburgh up and running in 24 hours, whereas in this case it ended up… It took weeks and weeks for the city to get back online.

Jim Cantore

And we’re always going to keep learning, because like I said, the one constant is human behavior. Where most people wouldn’t go out in that stuff, there are still some that do. But if you don’t shut it down properly, or your time the storm, you create gridlock. And we’ve seen this everywhere. It’s not just Southern cities. It’s not just Atlanta and Charlotte. We’ve seen it in New York city. We’ve seen it in Baltimore, Washington, St. Louis, Kansas city. It happens. It’s because of not buying in. And you know what, here’s the hardest thing about buying in, is we’re still going to be wrong.

This is not a perfect… It never will be a perfect science, I don’t think, in my life. But you got to take your lickings and always look at the fact that we missed this one, and we probably caused a little heartache because we were wrong about the snow amounts. It didn’t amount to what we thought it would. But just take 10 seconds and think for a second, if we nailed it or if we didn’t nail this, and it was a huge snowstorm, and you got caught out in it. So you think you have problems now. You can be upset with me, but my goodness, if I didn’t tell you it was coming and you got totally shell shocked by it, you’re going to be a lot more upset with me.

Alex Roy

DO you always err on the side of caution, Jim, in your predictions?

Jim Cantore

I’m going to say, yes, we do, because I think to present a worst case scenario means everybody can prepare. And I also think that even preparations for like… A lot of times on the coast, if we tell you a category one hurricane is coming, you should actually prepare for a cat two. And a lot of times in the surge forecast, you’re going to see a worst case scenario. And some of that is in there. Does the surge get maximized by the time of high tides? Are you going to be right in that big zone where the biggest surge is going to come in? So those are what the surge forecasts are based on, because if the water is three feet higher than we forecast it to be where you are, and that three feet is in the middle of your house, and you don’t have a second floor retreat to, we didn’t do our job.

So yes, we will always err on the side of caution, and we will always probably look a category up to where we can be. And guys, on that note this year, if you think back to the 10 rapid developers that we had and the number of rapid developers in 2020 before they came to shore. Hannah wound up being a billion dollar disaster. It was supposed to come ashore as a tropical storm in a very unpopulated part of Texas, but it ramped up to a cat two, affected a lot more people, had a much higher surge. So these kinds of things I really want you to prepare for and hope for the best. Always, always.

Bryan Salesky

I was going to bring up that storm Hannah, because that was a good example, Jim, and that was one where if you’re putting safety first, you want people to over-prepare. And in a lot of ways for these worst weather events, this is a safety system at the end of the day, isn’t it?

Jim Cantore

Yes it is. And my job as a meteorologist on camera is to be a good servant and prepare people for that. And look, I’m not afraid to be wrong and there have been. I will be wrong again. I have been wrong in the past. But I will tell you, I get up every morning at 3:30, 4:15, somewhere in that range, depending on when I’m going on, and look at the weather. And I look at things I need to look at. Do I wish I had more time sometimes? Absolutely. Do I go in sometimes and even keep preparing in between segments? Absolutely. Do I change my mind in the morning about something when a new model run comes in? Absolutely. But that’s the whole point, is the closer we are to the event, typically the better guidance we have.

And if we see a storm it’s actually intensifying upon landfall, like Sally did, for example… The problem with Sally was everyone was thinking, “Oh, Louisiana, Louisiana, Louisiana,” again. But this thing just kept shifting right, shifting right, shifting right. And all of a sudden now you’ve got a landfall in Gulf Shores, Alabama, and a right front quadrant in Pensacola. So there was no time to get boats out and there was no time really for people to accept this change in the forecast. And sometimes that can happen in tropical systems. It can be last minute, regardless of how good we are in knowing where kind of it’s going to go. But there’s a big difference in something coming in South central Louisiana versus coming into Gulf Shores, Alabama.

Alex Roy

If an autonomous vehicle fleet is going to deploy in a city… I’m in Miami, where rain systems can affect one neighborhood and not another. Knowing with accuracy down to neighborhood level or even block level could make a huge difference in terms of deploying those vehicles or pulling them back. How much more accurate can prediction get on a local, granular level with more sensors, more data, and social media?

Jim Cantore

I’m just going to marry the two things that we got going on here. Imagine if programs are written so that there are sensors that detect snow on the roads, that detect snow coming down hard enough on the vehicle to where it slows you down. Because we lose 1800 lives a year on average in ice and snow. And a lot of times it’s because people are driving too fast. And that’s human error. If we can eliminate that… Let’s just say humans are still driving, but if we can actually create a situation where vehicles naturally slow down because they detect the snow and ice on the roads and the rate at which it’s coming down, we’re going to be able to save lives.

So if I’m forecasting heavy snow between, let’s say, three and four o’clock moving into the Atlanta Metro area, the commute’s already started. It’s going to be gridlock no matter how you slice it. People aren’t going home really. Hopefully people will come home early or work from home when that situation first… But If they don’t, if they have to get out on the roads for whatever reason, to have that vehicle slow down is going to, I think, eliminate loss of life and really potentially log jams on the roads. We’ll see.

Alex Roy

So people have suggested that having a screen in an autonomous vehicle which depicts what the vehicle sees will build trust and confidence in the technology. You talked about how creating these visualizations in the studio educate people, or people trust your prediction more because they can visually see in the studio what’s going to happen to the park in their neighborhood. Do you think people need to see these kinds of visualizations in an autonomous vehicle as a passenger?

Jim Cantore

That’s a great question. I would rather have the technology. First of all, if I’m going to trust getting in something that I’m not driving, I want to know that that vehicle knows what conditions it’s driving in. Like I was just talking about with the snow, with a heavy rain coming down. Imagine the pounding of the rain, whether it be on the windshield or whatever sensors that are on the vehicle, it detects the potential for hydroplaning. It detects water accumulating on the road. Because we know when it’s raining at an inch or two an hour, the water’s going to accumulate on the roads. There’s no question about it. The vehicle’s detecting that, it’s slowing you down. That’s the kind of stuff I think that we need.

And yeah, on your screen there, “Hey, we are about to slow the vehicle down due to high potential for hydroplaning.” A lot of times you just want to bowl through it, “This is no problem. I got this.” But the sensors know, and the sensor… I think through research and what we know about hydroplaning and people going too fast in weather situations, I think in the end, that’s the kind of thing that could really help us out. I don’t know how we would visually see that per se, but just trusting in the fact that something comes on a screen and it says, “Due to excessive rainfall rates, your vehicle’s going to slow down 20 miles per hour.”

Bryan Salesky

You could even just start with the subscription type of thing to opt in, and you always have to be careful with consumer choice, and this is always a big debate around how much control and oversight to put into the smarts of the vehicles. But I think most people, if they said, “Hey, as part of a connected vehicle subscription, you can opt in and get certain weather information that’s going to help you make smarter driving choices, even to the point of helping to control the behavior of the vehicle,” I think a lot of people would actually select that. And in fact, a lot of parents would probably say, “I’m going to require my kid to have that enabled when they’re in the car.” Because it’s oftentimes inexperienced drivers that don’t have that judgment or intuition. So I think you’ve opened up a whole new really interesting thread that we can think about as part of driver assistance technology, for sure.

Jim Cantore

Everyone, I talk to who owns a new vehicle now loves the new cruise control. It’s not braking and then resetting. Your car knows the distance between you and the vehicles in front of you and it automatically slows down. So I know, for me… I’m just talking to my own person [inaudible 00:31:25]. To be able to put that on and set that in my truck, in my F150, it’s beautiful, because I know I’m never going to come up on somebody… Unless they cut in front of me or something like that. But I never know I’m not going to come upon somebody at a rate where I can’t brake.

Bryan Salesky

Yeah, it’s really nice. It helps you concentrate on other more important things in some ways. But to your point, if we can then feed in a model of what the weather is and what it’s likely to be, and even… I mean, there’s systems today on the car that are already detecting whether we’re on a low mu type of surface where the traction’s not the best, you’ve got electronic stability control. There’s a lot of signals that come from the self-driving system that can actually make electronic stability control even better. Now you imagine putting in an overlay on some of the higher confidence weather data. You start to have a pretty smart vehicle at that point.

Jim Cantore

So you’re putting in your GPS a trip that you want to take from Denver, let’s say up to Breckenridge. You know you’re going to go up in elevation. You know there’s a storm coming in. At some elevation you’re going to… And this is a late spring… At some elevation you may go from rain to snow. The model will be able to tell that to you. You’ll be able to see, once you put that into the GPS, “Hey, once you get to Silverthorne or whatever,” all of a sudden now you got snow on the roads.

Or you’ll have some on the roads because the assistant may not have started yet, but by the time you get there, it’s expected to be snowing at that elevation. So that would be a really cool feature to have, to just… Like planning a trip when people are just initially putting that in to their GPS. They’re going to be like, “Well that’s probably going to slow me down,” which it will. And they can plan for that. And then they can make a decision. “I really don’t want to drive in the snow. I really don’t want to go up and deal with that snow on the road.”

Bryan Salesky

Yeah, that’s totally doable. You reminded me, when we need to scout out test locations, we know who to consult here, Alex.

Alex Roy

We got to get Jim in one of the Argo vehicles for a ride in Miami, he can see it for himself.

Bryan Salesky

Open invitation, Jim.

Jim Cantore

Guys, I would totally do it. In a heartbeat. I really would. But I want it to be out on those days where you’ve either got a landfalling hurricane a big squall line coming in, just to really get the full benefit.

Bryan Salesky

We’ll put you on an evacuation route.

Alex Roy

What an incredible conversation. Jim Cantore is the face of the Weather Channel. Jim, we’re so glad you could join us today. And Bryan, you too. Talk to you soon.

Bryan Salesky

Thanks Jim. That was really a cool conversation. You knitted together a lot of threads that are pretty interesting.

Jim Cantore

Thank you. I appreciate it.

Alex Roy

Folks, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please connect with us on social. We’re on Twitter @NoParkingPod. And of course I’m everywhere on, well, let’s just say, Twitter @AlexRoy144. Please share No Parking with a friend, like us, subscribe, give us a good review wherever you listen to podcasts. This show is managed by the Civic Entertainment Group. Megan Harris is our awesome producer. And Bryan Salesky is the CEO and founder of Argo AI. 

Until next time, I’m Alex Roy, and this is the No Parking Podcast.